‘Sea Junk Scientist’ Keynote Speaker at Sh.O.R.E. Symposium

‘Sea Junk Scientist’ Keynote Speaker at Sh.O.R.E. Symposium

by Lisa D. Mickey
News Release

NEW SMYRNA BEACH, Fla., Nov. 15, 2018 – The fourth annual Sh.O.R.E. Symposium will once again give the public an opportunity to learn more about current issues and research relating to the Indian River Lagoon.

Co-presented by the Marine Discovery Center, the Atlantic Center for the Arts and Daytona State College, Sh.O.R.E. — Sharing Our Research with Everyone – will be held Friday, Nov. 30.

Sh.O.R.E. will return to the Brannon Civic Center, located at 105 South Riverside Drive in New Smyrna Beach. Registration will begin at 9:30 a.m., with the event starting at 10 a.m.

This year’s keynote speaker will be Dr. Marcus Eriksen, an environmental scientist, educator and author focused on building stronger communities through art, science, adventure and activism.

Founder of the 5-Gyres Institute, Eriksen is involved in research about the global distribution and ecological impacts of plastic marine pollution.

His studies have included sailing expeditions through all five subtropical gyres and his book, “Junk Raft” details an oceanic voyage and discusses how oceanic plastic pollution impacts humans and the planet.

Osprey Nesting Platform

“Our keynote speaker offers a compelling story about water-related issues,” said Marine Discovery Center Executive Director Chad Truxall. “This year will focus on single-use plastics and their impact in our waters.”

The annual symposium is designed to provide useful information for all citizens, Truxall added. High school students and college undergraduates will join science professionals in presenting information to the public about their recent research, current scientific findings and management strategies for the Indian River Lagoon.

“S.h.O.R.E. aims to provide information about problems, but also about solutions,” he said. “We always hope people will come away from this event knowing more and thinking they can do more to help.”

Students will also display scientific posters in the Brannon Center during lunch, which will be provided at no charge to all pre-registered attendees. Members of the professional science community will select top oral and poster presentations for cash prizes to the participating students, which will conclude the symposium around 4:30 p.m.

“The students who will be presenting at Sh.O.R.E. could become our future scientists,” said Dr. Debra Woodall, professor at Daytona State College’s Institute of Marine and Environmental Studies, and an organizer of Sh.O.R.E.

“This event provides our students with the opportunity to understand what it’s like to be a scientist and to learn how to speak to the public about science.”

New this year will be an interactive art exhibit entitled “How Plastic Are We?” The Atlantic Center for the Arts (ACA) will host the student-created exhibit, which is inspired by this year’s ocean-plastics theme and is a commentary on the presence of plastics in waterways and natural habitats.

The exhibit will be held at the ACA Harris House, located near the Brannon Center at 214 South Riverside Drive in New Smyrna Beach, and will be on display from 4-7 p.m., Nov. 30-Dec. 1.

“ACA is honored to partner with Sh.O.R.E. in bridging the fields of science and art,” said Eve Payor, director of Harris House Community Programs. “This year, ACA has contributed by leading a creative outreach program with Daytona State College photography students and environmental artist Skip Snow.”

“It is vital for scientists to think creatively about solutions, and for artists to make statements about our changing environment,” added Payor. “Both disciplines can collaborate and share knowledge that will help humanity navigate the future.”

Following the symposium, ACA will partner with Sh.O.R.E. to offer an author’s book signing across the street from the Brannon Center at the Harris House.

Keynote speaker Dr. Eriksen will sign copies of his book “Junk Raft” at Harris House immediately following the student presentation awards and Sh.O.R.E. conclusion. Books may be purchased for $10 (cash only) and signed on site by the author.

Books must be reserved in advance by contacting Dr. Woodall at SHORE@daytonastate.edu. Books may only be purchased at the event.

River Park Terrace restaurant, located adjacent to Harris House, will host a casual reception, as well as adult beverages for purchase during the author book signing and art exhibit.

Sh.O.R.E. is free to the public, but online preregistration is required by Thursday, Nov. 29, by visiting www.DaytonaState.edu/ShORE. Final registration will also be held at the door on the day of the event, starting at 9:30 a.m. Seating at the Brannon Center is limited. You can view and download the full agenda here.

Can’t attend Sh.O.R.E. but still want to get involved? Dr. Eriksen will be in town recording data on trash gathered from the beach and to assist we will be hosting a large beach clean up in Port Orange on Wednesday, November 28 from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m. We will be using the Litterati app to collect information on trash picked up from our beaches, so be sure to bring your smart phone!  Download the flyer or visit the Facebook Event Page for more information.

Contacts:  Dr. Debra Woodall at 386-506-3765 or at SHORE@daytonastate.edu.
For all other media questions, contact lisa@marinediscoverycenter.org.

Best-selling Author Keynote Speaker For Sh.O.R.E. Symposium

Best-selling Author Keynote Speaker For Sh.O.R.E. Symposium

Osprey Nesting Platform

by Lisa D. Mickey
News Release

NEW SMYRNA BEACH, Fla., Oct. 18, 2017 – Best-selling author and 2017 “Champions of Change” award recipient Wallace J. Nichols, will be the keynote speaker at this year’s Sh.O.R.E. Symposium.

The Marine Discovery Center, Atlantic Center for the Arts, and Daytona State College will again host Sh.O.R.E. – Sharing Our Research with Everyone — an annual symposium designed to address current issues and research relating to the Indian River Lagoon (IRL).

The third annual, all-day event will be held Friday, Dec. 1, at the Brannon Civic Center at 105 South Riverside Drive in New Smyrna Beach.

 

Dr. Nichols published in 2014 his book, “Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How being Near, In, On or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, and Better At What You Do.”

Nichols has been called the “keeper of the sea” by GQ magazine and “a visionary” by Outside magazine. A California-based marine biologist and water advocate, Dr. Nichols has authored more than 200 scientific papers, technical reports, book chapters and popular publications. He has also appeared in numerous print, film, radio and television media outlets, and has lectured in more than 30 countries.

His research has spanned ocean and aquatic ecosystems, migratory species, marine protected areas, fisheries management and plastic pollution. According to his website, “Blue Mind,” describes the “physical, ecological, economic, cognitive, emotional, psychological and social benefits of healthy oceans and waterways.”

“We’re trying to engage a broader audience this year by bringing in a renowned keynote speaker who will interest our community,” said Dr. Debra Woodall, director of the Institute of Marine and Environmental Studies (IMES) at Daytona State College.

“We hope the public will come hear him speak and will also stay to learn more about the issues and proposed solutions associated with the Indian River Lagoon,” added Woodall, assistant department chair of DSC’s school of biological and physical sciences.

Woodall believes Nichols’ focus on the power of water and the role it plays in the lives of people is a natural fit with the residents of coastal Central Florida.

“We certainly understand the economic impact of water in our area,” Woodall said. “But water also has a very positive physiological and psychological impact on us.”

Following the symposium, the Atlantic Center for the Arts (ACA) will partner with Sh.O.R.E., and will offer an author’s book signing across the street from the Brannon Center at the Harris House. A reception at the River Park Terrace will also be held.

“ACA’s future role with this event will be to engage high school and undergraduate students in addressing environmental issues expressed through art,” added Woodall. “This will help reach many citizens because some people become educated through science, while others learn through art.”

The Sh.O.R.E. Symposium will begin at 9:30 a.m., with sessions running until 4 p.m.

High school students and college undergraduates will join science professionals in presenting information to the public about their recent research, current scientific findings and management strategies for the Indian River Lagoon.

The Sh.O.R.E. event is free to the public, but preregistration is required. Seating will be limited.

For more information and to preregister, visit www.DaytonaState.edu/ShORE. Online preregistration deadline will be Nov. 29.